Cutting Techniques

 FCO  (Flat-Cut-Out)  Letters

Flat-Cut-Out (FCO) Letters are probably the mainstay of the architectural sign industry.  These letters can be cut out of a wide variety of materials such as metals, plastics, composites, wood and others.  They can be dressed up with edge treatments such as a bevel or round-over.

Engraving and 3-D Engraving

With 3-D engraving, a pointed bit is used which leaves a V-Cut or "Chisled" bottom.  This technique allows the bit to travel out of the cuts in such a way as to leave the corners nice and sharp. Sometimes a combination of the two is needed as in the photo above. If you look closely you'll see a flat bottom with beveled edges and sharp corners.

Inlays and Push-Throughs

With Inlays, a pocket is cut into the background material and another piece is cut to fit into the pocket like a jigsaw puzzle piece.  The inlaid piece may fit down flush with the back or extend up above it.  What with the many different combinations of materials, colors and techniques, the possibilities here are endless. With Push- Throughs, letters are cut (usually acrylic) to fit through matching holes cut into a thin panel (usually aluminum).  The letters usually extend out beyond the surface of the back and are often lit from behind.

True Prismatic and Simulated

Prismatic

True Prismatic letters are way cool.  But they are also a lot of work.  Simulated Prismatic letters are also pretty cool and a lot easier to make.

Unusual Techniques

  As they say, "Necessity is the mother of invention!"  Some of the challenges we've faced have resulted in our developing new techniques.  Pictured at right are two examples of our "Folded Aluminum" Technique. Others include "Simulated Woodgrain", "Pebble Texture" on Engraved Signs,  Custom "Vandalized" Finishes, "Simulated Wrought Iron" Technique and others.
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Cutting Techniques

 FCO  (Flat-Cut-Out)  Letters

Flat-Cut-Out (FCO) Letters are probably the mainstay of the architectural sign industry.  These letters can be cut out of a wide variety of materials such as metals, plastics, composites, wood and others.  They can be dressed up with edge treatments such as a bevel or round-over.

Engraving and 3-D Engraving

With 3-D engraving, a pointed bit is used which leaves a V-Cut or "Chisled" bottom.  This technique allows the bit to travel out of the cuts in such a way as to leave the corners nice and sharp. Sometimes a combination of the two is needed as in the photo above. If you look closely you'll see a flat bottom with beveled edges and sharp corners.

Inlays and Push-Throughs

With Inlays, a pocket is cut into the background material and another piece is cut to fit into the pocket like a jigsaw puzzle piece.  The inlaid piece may fit down flush with the back or extend up above it.  What with the many different combinations of materials, colors and techniques, the possibilities here are endless. With Push- Throughs, letters are cut (usually acrylic) to fit through matching holes cut into a thin panel (usually aluminum).  The letters usually extend out beyond the surface of the back and are often lit from behind.

True Prismatic and Simulated

Prismatic

True Prismatic letters are way cool.  But they are also a lot of work.  Simulated Prismatic letters are also pretty cool and a lot easier to make.

Unusual Techniques

  As they say, "Necessity is the mother of invention!"  Some of the challenges we've faced have resulted in our developing new techniques.  Pictured at right are two examples of our "Folded Aluminum" Technique. Others include "Simulated Woodgrain", "Pebble Texture" on Engraved Signs,  Custom "Vandalized" Finishes, "Simulated Wrought Iron" Technique and others.